Tuesday, 29 January 2013

While her natural father Horatio raised his admiral's pennant on HMS St George at Torbay, ready to sail for the Baltic, Horatia was born


"Victory, October 19th, 1805. My dearest Angel, I was made happy by the pleasure of receiving your letter of September 19th, and I rejoice to hear that you are so very good a girl, and love my dear Lady Hamilton, who most dearly loves you. Give her a kiss for me. The Combined Fleets of the Enemy are now reported to be coming out of Cadiz; and therefore I answer your letter, my dearest Horatia, to mark to you that you are ever uppermost in my thoughts. I shall be sure of your prayers for my safety, conquest, and speedy return to dear Merton, and our dearest good Lady Hamilton. Be a good girl, mind what Miss Connor says to you. Receive, my dearest Horatia, the affectionate parental blessing of your Father, NELSON AND BRONTE."

And no, it's not Old Nel dressing up, but his natural daughter Horatia (from a portrait painted in 1822)


29 January 1801, while her natural father Horatio raised his admiral's pennant on HMS St George at Torbay, ready to sail for the Baltic, Horatia was born in the Piccadilly residence of her mother Emma's husband Sir William Hamilton.

Even though Sir William at least tolerated the liaison between his wife and the celebrated naval hero, it became much easier for the couple to life openely as a family in Merton Place in Surrey, especially after Hamilton's death in 1803, when Nelson was on shore during the Peace of Amiens.

Nelson obviously doted on his family and ensured that Horatia could take his name after his death at Trafalgar in October 1805.

Horatia Nelson was described as a bright and talented child and grew up to live a long, rich life. She died at the age of 80 and was mother of 10 children.

More on Horatia on:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatia_Nelson